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The Body Temperature and Sleep Deprivation:- "The Perfect Sleep Pad"


The Perfect Sleep Pad is a water-based system that syncs with the body temperature that allows the ideal temperature to be maintained during the night. The water inside The Perfect Sleep Pad flows through tube that are embedded inside the pad.  These tubes are connected to an advance micro-processing temperature controller that either heats or cools the water to your individual and ideal sleep temperature. The temperature of the water in the Perfect Sleep Pad ranges from 46°F to 118°F and can be adjusted with your remote control or directly on the controller. The Perfect Sleep Pad offers a solution for anyone suffering from sleep disturbances due to difficulties in regulating their body temperature. This applies to couples with different temperature preferences, as well as athletes and women suffering from menopausal hot flashes and night sweats.

The Perfect Sleep Pad can also benefit cancer patients who suffer from temperature related sleep disturbances caused by their medications and treatments.
The cooling pad helps in reducing insomnia. The temperature can be controlled from an individual’s side of the bed without disturbing the partner’s side of the bed; hence, increasing the number of hours of disrupted sleep.

Thermal environment is the key element of sleep; this is because thermoregulation is significantly associated to the mechanism of regulating sleep. Either too high or low ambient temperature can have an impact on sleep even though the individual is healthy or not suffering from insomnia. Disrupted nocturnal sleep can influence the day-to-day activities of a person, it is also linked to several adverse health effects (AHE) including obesity, the quality of life and increase in mortality rate. Numerous findings illustrate that cultivating a pleasant thermal sleep environment is essential for maintaining sleep; daily activities; the quality of the health.

There are many studies that show that sleep is related to thermoregulation. Individuals have the tendency to develop a sleep-wake rhythm which is usually repeated in a 24-hours cycle. The decrease in nocturnal sleep phase and the increase of the wake-phase which is a 24-hours repeated cycle is due to the sleep-wake rhythm caused by the core body temperature. Sleep is most likely to occur when there is a decrease in the temperature core. The association between the sleep-wake rhythm and the circadian rhythm of the temperature core is significant for maintaining sleep(Okamoto-Mizuno & Mizuno, 2012).

The potential physiological mechanisms related to sleep deprivation and excess energy balance include changes in appetite and increased time to access food, which may influence energy intake (EI), and extended wakeful time at night, physical inactivity due to fatigue, and decreased thermogenesis, which may affect energy expenditure (EE) (Hibi et al., 2017).
Insomnia is the most common sleep disorder that impacts a considerable number of the population on a circumstantial, frequent, or chronic basis. Generally, insomnia is categorized as a sleep dissatisfaction which makes it difficult to maintain sleep along with a significant distress and impairment of functioning during the daytime. Constant insomnia is related with adverse health outcome which includes a decrease in the quality of life, physical and psychological morbidity (Jean-Philippe Chaput, 2018)





Insomnia involves difficulty falling asleep, remaining asleep and early morning awakenings. People who are affected by insomnia may have difficulties focusing, remembering, or achieving daily tasks; they may also have an increased risk of accidents. Insomnia may have consequences on the economic stability on the country such as incurred cost on the use of healthcare services, work absences and work-related injuries(Tjepkema, 2002).
The economic burden of a person in Canada due to insomnia is estimated at $5,010 per individual in a year; nearly 90% of this amount is associated with work absenteeism and reduced productivity. According to epidemiological studies, the prevalence of insomnia is between 6 to 48% of the Canadian population depending on the onset and severity of the symptoms of an individual. For instance, reports show that about 25% of adults express dissatisfied sleep, 10% to 15% of the people say that their insomnia is as a result of daytime consequences and 6% to 10% have insomnia disorder (Morin et al., 2011).




















REFERENCES:

Hibi, M., Kubota, C., Mizuno, T., Aritake, S., Mitsui, Y., Katashima, M., & Uchida, S. (2017). Effect of shortened sleep on energy expenditure, core body temperature, and appetite: A human randomised crossover trial. Scientific Reports, 7(1), 1–11. https://doi.org/10.1038/srep39640
Jean-Philippe Chaput, J. Y. D. P. R. and C. M. M. (2018, December 19). Prevalence of insomnia for Canadians aged 6 to 79. Retrieved May 20, 2020, from https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/82-003-x/2018012/article/00002-eng.htm
Morin, C. M., Leblanc, M., Bélanger, L., Ivers, H., Mérette, ; Chantal, & Savard, J. (2011). Prevalence of Insomnia and Its Treatment in Canada. The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 56(9), 540–548. https://doi.org/https://doi.org/10.1177/070674371105600905
Okamoto-Mizuno, K., & Mizuno, K. (2012). Effects of thermal environment on sleep and circadian rhythm. Journal of Physiological Anthropology, Vol. 31, pp. 1–9. https://doi.org/10.1186/1880-6805-31-14
Tjepkema, M. (2002). Methods Data sources.